Tag Archives: Trout Fly

Tying a Mohawk Hotspot Pheasant Tail Nymph Jig

The Mohawk Hotspot Pheasant Tail Nymph is a fly design from Justin Aldrich (check out his channel here – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCa5G…) and was featured on JStockard’s blog in May 2018. This variation of the Pheasant Tail Nymph (#PTN ) incorporates a unique hotspot, taking advantage of some seldom used real estate over top of the tungsten bead. I’ve used a hot pink floss for my demo flies, but any hot color that contrasts with the bead should work well. Try a black bead with a chartreuse floss or a silver bead with purple floss.

Mohawk Hotspot Pheasant Tail Nymph Jig Fly Pattern Recipe

Hook: Partridge SUJ #10-16 or similar jig hook
Bead: Gold tungsten (3.3mm for #12)
Thread: Rusty Brown 8/0 (70d)
Hot Spot: Floss (hot color)
Tail & body: 6-8 pheasant tail fibers or CDL fibers
Rib: Copper Ultrawire (sm)
Thorax: Peacock herl

Mohawk Hotspot Pheasant Tail Nymph
Mohawk Hotspot Pheasant Tail Nymph

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Youtube Channel: Piscator Flies
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Cluster Maggot or Maggot Cluster?

The Cluster Maggot is a dream find for any hungry trout, panfish or carp on the hunt. It’s likely that one of the first baits you used as a kid was a maggot on a hook, so you know how effective the off-white morsels are for catching. Now multiply this into a larger snack pack of a dozen maggots and you’ve got a winner on your hands.

The fly is tied in a similar manner as the Crystal Meth steelhead fly and finished like the San Juan Worm with a softly touched flame to the tips of each strand of chenille. If you do choose to target carp, I recommend using a heavier nymph hook for the fly.

Cluster maggot Fly Pattern recipe

Hook: Firehole 419 #12-16 (or another dry fly hook)
Thread: Buttercup 6/0 (70d) (white or cream thread)
Body: White or cream Ultra chenille
Accent: Ice Dubbing Pearl UV (Golden Brown)

Cluster Maggot fly pattern
Cluster Maggot fly pattern

Sources

Youtube Channel: Piscator Flies
Web: Piscator Flies
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Tying the Pyramid Lake Woolly Worm Cutthroat Trout Fly

I tie the Pyramid Lake Woolly Worm a little bit different from the ones from Jan Nemec, but they are essentially the same pattern. The chartreuse and black variation are referred to as the Northern Lights color. It’s a good choice for fishing water where the clarity isn’t optimal. You get a pop of color and a great looking silhouette streaming through the water.

Pyramid Lake in Nevada (not the one in Jasper, Alberta) is home to a threatened strain of cutthroat trout called the Lahontan. The Lahontan cutthroat is native to the drainages of the Truckee River, Humboldt River, Carson River, Walker River, Quinn River and several smaller rivers in the Great Basin of North America.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lahontan_cutthroat_trout

The fly is heavily hackled and uses 2 hackles palmered together over the Estaz body. I like to use hackles that are quite webby at the base and that may pass for schlappen. I like to add the reverse wrapped rib for a little added protection from the trout’s teeth. The 20lb plus cutthroats can really do a number on the stems of the hackle.

The fly is fished on a sinking line and is tied unweighted so that it doesn’t dig into the sandy bottom of the lake, but rather bounces over the bottom.

In addition to being a good Cutthroat Trout fly, this Woolly Worm variation is great for steelhead and even pike and bass.

Pyramid Lake Woolly Worm Fly pattern recipe

Hook: Mustad R75-79580 #2-8
Thread: 140d Black 6/0
Tail: Chartreuse marabou or saddle hackle fluff
Rib: Small chartreuse Ultrawire
Body: Fl. Green Opal Estaz
Hackle: 2 Black saddle hackles

If you like this pattern, check out the Woolly Bugger.

Sources

Youtube Channel: Piscator Flies
Web: Piscator Flies
Instagram: piscatorflies
Twitter: piscatorflies
Facebook: piscatorflies

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