Tag Archives: parachute fly

CDC Budding Beatis Emerger by Jim Misiura

The CDC Budding Beatis Emerger is the perfect little parachute dry fly to float down a narrow trout stream this spring. The fly is a little more advance for a beginner fly, but that shouldn’t dissuade you from giving it a try. The fly uses a stripped peacock herl for the abdomen. You can make these easily by either putting the herl sit in a bleach solution for a couple minutes, or using a finger or an eraser to strip away the fibers (see video below). The second hitch will be the dubbing loop and the block. If you have a set of the Marc Petitjean Magic Tools, you are golden, but you can also improvise some of your own tools with a chip clip (or a bulldog clip) and some sticky backed foam.

CDC Budding Beatis Emerger Fly Pattern Recipe

Hook: Fine Wire Scud #16 – #20
Thread: Olive 16/0
Shuck: Antron
Abdomen: Stripped Peacock Herl
Thorax: Olive Dubbing
Wingpost: White Foam
Hackle: Slate Grey CDC
Be sure to check out this and other videos on Jim Misiura’s Youtube page.

Share

Sulphur Para-emerger – Don Bastian

While Don is best known for his fantastic classic wet flies and streamers, he is also an accomplished tyer on a commercial scale. He has begun to present patterns on his blog that stray from his traditional offerings. The beginning of a wonderful library of trout patterns in beginning to emerge, and this latest really has me wanting to hit the vise. Don has some wonderful descriptions of the materials listed in the blog post, and what I like best about this parachute is the way the post is tied in. The little bump of foam before the post will really make sure this thing floats well.

Sulphur Para-emerger - Don Bastian
Sulphur Para-emerger - Don Bastian

If you haven’t already, be sure to follow Don’s blog to get all the newest posts delivered to your inbox.

Share

720º Vise – Parachute Mayfly

I’ve seen this vise advertised in a couple of the fly fishing magazines and was interested to just how it operates. Basically, in addition to the standard 360º jaw rotation, this vise also introduces a rotary base, allowing the tyer to spin the vise like a potters wheel. I wasn’t exactly sure how that would help a tyer, but after seeing it in action, tackling a parachute fly, it became obvious. The gallows tool comes in handy here as well, anchoring the post and creating a nice base to build the wing on. Video 1 is pretty standard stuff, check out part 2 for the magic.

Share