Tag Archives: Intruder

Redemption Micro Intruder by Jay Nicholas

This micro intruder pattern is tied up by the Caddis Angling Fly Shop’s Jay Nicholas. Jay goes into a little bit about the differences between intruders and micro intruders and how the intruder genre has evolved over the last decade or so. Jay ties on a slick looking Regal Revolution Fly Tying Vise for this video. I picked one up for myself a couple weeks back and have been loving it as a second vise. You can change up the colors on the fly to target other species, but the pink and blue make it a good steelhead fly for both winter and summer.

Redemption Micro Intruder Tube Fly Pattern Recipe

Tube: Plastic tube
Thread: 6/0 Black
Butt: Spun pink Senyo Fusion Dubbing
Collar: Pink hackle or schlappen
Body: Lagartun Flat braid
Shoulder: Spun blue Senyo Fusion Dubbing
Collar: Softhackle light blue then spey marabou
Flash: Flashabou tied each side
Legs: Black Ostrich herl
Front Collar: Black schlappen
Head: Sonic cone

Be sure to check out this and other videos on The Caddis Fly Angling Shop’s Youtube page and subscribe for more videos.

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Rhea Intruder tied by Phil Rowley

Rhea Intruder - Tied by Phil Rowley
Rhea Intruder – Tied by Phil Rowley

Phil always put together great step-by-step tutorials and goes the extra mile to provide information about the fly and materials used. This pattern was born in the vise of fly tyer Trevor Nowak and uses a big helping of Rhea tendrils to impart action into the streamer. Rhea has become quite popular in steelhead and salmon flies over the past decade thanks in no small part to tyers like Nowak rhea guru Todd Scharf. Phil has some extras in the article about preparing the feathers to use in patterns so the herls are wrapped and paltered easily.

You can find the full step-by-step tutorial on Phil’s website http://flycraftangling.com, and get some insights to tying with rhea.

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Tina Intruder Tube – José “Pepefly” Borzi

José “Pepefly” Borzi has an interesting take on the Intruder here with an all orange design. Most interesting, to me at least, is the use of a whole rhea feather for the hackle. It will really give the fly some interesting movement in the water, but I do see a couple problems using the feather this way. For one, the feathers are on the expensive side, so to ensure the fly remains durable, I would reinforce the hackled rhea with a reverse wrapped wire. Secondly, when the fly gets wet, the rhea will collapse somewhat onto itself. To remedy that, I think a thick dubbed body might help the rhea stand out more, after all, the whole point of the style is to create the illusion of a big fly with as little material as possible. Perhaps the different target species may play a roll in the fly construction as well. Even with that said, I do like the fly and love seeing the flies from South America.

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