Category Archives: Spey Flies

Heggeli Spey Fly tied by Davie McPhail

The Heggeli Spey Fly is of course a Spey style fly which uses a traditional method of tying. Davie offers some great little tips in his tying tutorial to help with some of the challenges that tyers, both beginners and experienced, encounter tying this type of fly. Adding a little super glue under the tag is a great tip. It keeps the tinsel in place and also prevents it from slipping down the hook once it’s been wet. Oval tinsel can expand in the water, and by using the extra adhesive, will prevent the fly from coming apart prematurely.

Davie uses a ringneck pheasant rump feather rather than a blue-eared pheasant feather for this fly. If you can find a large ringneck pelt, it should supply a plentiful supply of suitable hackles. The blue-eared pheasant can be pricy and hard to find, so this alternative is a welcome suggestion. It is best if you can have a look at the rump before purchasing as the ringneck rumps can be on the smaller side.

Lastly, Davie offers some great tips for setting the wing on the Spey fly. Using bronze mallard and some dubbing wax, Davie expertly ties this fly. I’m sure it’ll take the beginner at least a few tries, but well worth the effort when you can finally present a well tied Spey.

Heggeli Spey Fly pattern recipe

Hook: Spey Style size 2
Threads: UTC-140 and Uni-8/0 Black
Tag: Oval Silver Tinsel
Tail: Golden Pheasant Tippet
Rib: Oval Silver Tinsel
Body: Silver Mylar Tinsel
Body and Throat Hackle: Ringneck Pheasant Rump
Wing: Bronze Mallard
Eyes: Jungle Cock
Head: Black

Sources

Youtube Channel: Davie McPhail
Youtube Video: Heggeli Spey Fly pattern

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Freestyle Spey Fly by Davie McPhail

Davie ties this Freestyle Spey with his usual effortless style. The chartreuse white eared pheasant dip dyed red and sunburst may be a little tricky to acquire, but the main take-away of the video is a template you can use to tie a Spey style fly. You can use other Spey hackles such as burnt goose, blue eared pheasant to even schlappen with one side stripped. Davie ties the wing with 2 sets of bronze mallard strips, a technique I haven’t seen before.

Hook: Size 2 Blue Heron or Similar
Thread: Black 8/0 UNI-thread
Rib: UTC Mirage and Oval Silver Tinsel
Butt: Chartreuse wool
Body: Black Wool
Body: Hackle, White Eared Pheasant Dip Dyed Chartreuse, Sunburst and Red
Throat: Dyed Chartreuse Mallard Flank
Wing: Bronze Mallard
Head: Fire Orange

Be sure to check out this and other videos on Davie McPhail’s Youtube page.

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Scott Howell Tying the Black and Blue Squidro Intruder

I’ve been tying up a ton of Squidro Intruders over the past few months. I found a huge cache of silicone bass skirt material and have been happily whittling it down. The video is a little long, but is full of great technique for tying dubbing loops and rubber. I’ve been using a heavy wire shank, but a Waddington or Senyo shank works perfectly too. For the shirts, I find using the type with both ends fused work the best for keeping things under control and being able to tie in the legs all at once. It helps speed up the tying. With the huge range of silicone skirts available, there are endless possibilities for the pattern. Scott ties this using a loop on the back to guide the leader (old school), but you can also tie the streamer using a loop of wire and trailer hook.

Black and Blue Squidro
Shank: Waddington, Senyo or other shank 1 3/4″ (45mm)
Thread: 6/0 White / Black
Tag: Silver Mylar tinsel
Leader Guide: 20b mono
Butt: Kingfisher Blue dubbing (looped)
Rear Collar: Silicone skirt legs then Kingfisher Blue dubbing (looped)
Body: Silver Mylar Tinsel
Front Collar: Black dubbing then black finn raccoon(looped) and Silicone skirt legs (tied forward) then black marabou palmered
Weight: Dumbbell eyes 4.5 – 5.5 mm

Be sure to check out this and other videos on Scott Howell’s Youtube page.

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