Bleeding Schlappen Leech

Bleeding Schlappen Leech – Darren MacEachern

Leeches are a staple food item for trout in lakes and streams. I have often heard them described as dessert for feeding trout. This pattern came about because I wanted a heavier version of a Woolly Bugger with out adding lead or expensive metal beads. In bright sunny conditions, this pattern glows due to the silver-lined beads. While glass beads don’t weigh much, the amount used in the pattern creates a quick sinking treat for trout. I tie this in a light tan, purple, and olive as well as the black.

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Bleeding Schlappen Leech
Bleeding Schlappen Leech

The Bleeding Schlappen Leech
Originated by Darren MacEachern
Tied by Darren MacEachern

Hook: 4xl streamer hook size 2 – 12.
Thread: Black 8/0 (70 Denier)
Tail: Black Marabou
Body: Red Silver-lined Glass Beads
Hackle: Peacock Black Schlappen

Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 1
Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 1

1. De-barb the hook and slide on 5-6 red silver lined beads. De-barbing the hook helps the beads slide onto the hook a lot easier. You may be able to slide the beads over the barb if you want to keep the barb.

Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 2
Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 2

2. Push all of the beads forward. Tie on your thread behind the last bead, and wrap towards the bend of the hook creating an even thread base. Do not build up too much bulk, as you will need to push the beads over this section.

Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 3
Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 3

3. Tie in a clump of marabou at the bend of the hook. It should extend about the length of the hook shank. Use close touching wraps to tie down the marabou to the beads.

Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 4
Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 4

4. Wrap your thread back to the tail. Push the bead back towards the hook bend. They will need to go back over the tied down marabou. The goal is to create enough room behind the eye to tie in the second hackle.

Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 5
Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 5

5. Next, prepare a natural black or a dyed black schlappen feather by stroking the fibers towards the base of the feather, leaving a small section intact at the tip. With the tip forward. Make sure to tie the hackle so that when it is held vertical, the natural curve of the feather points to the rear of the fly.

Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 6
Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 6

6. Trim off the tip of the tied in feather, and begin wrapping the schlappen forward. Pull the schlappen fibers backwards as the feather is wrapped forward. This will create a smooth collar with all of the fibers sweeping towards the back of the fly. Whip finish the hackle, and trim the thread. Add head cement for durability.

Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 7
Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 7

7. Re attach the thread in front of the beads and wrap backwards to tighten the beads together. You can build a small bump here to secure the beads in place.

Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 8
Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 8

8. Prepare a second black schlappen feather, and tie it in by the tip near the eye of the hook. Secure the feather to the beads.

Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 9
Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 9

9. Trim off the tip of the tied in feather, and begin wrapping the schlappen forward. Pull the schlappen fibers backwards as the feather is wrapped forward. This will create a smooth collar with all of the fibers sweeping towards the back of the fly. Trim off any excess feather.

Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 10
Bleeding Schlappen Leech - Step 10

10. Create a neat head and whip finish the fly. Add head cement for durability. For an added touch, you can give the fly a red head.

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